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Drupal vs WordPress - A Lego Analogy

Choosing a platform on which to build your website can be a daunting task. There is an ever-growing list of content management systems (CMS) from advanced platforms like Drupal and WordPress to all-inclusive DIY website builders like Wix and Squarespace. The right choice depends on factors such as desired functionality, flexibility, available budget, and your ability to manage the site after launch.

Where you fall on the spectrum between mom-and-pop shops and enterprise businesses will also heavily influence your decision.

  Mom-and-Pop <—————————> Enterprise

Questions to consider before choosing your CMS

  • How often do you want to post or update content?
  • How many content editors will be adding to the site?  
  • Do your editors need varying degrees of access and permissions?
  • Will your site have a heavy reliance on search, interactivity, or 3rd-party integrations?
  • Do you have specific design needs that require multiple custom layouts?
  • Will you be able to support the site without developer support?
  • What is your project budget?  
  • What is your post-launch support budget?

Scalability vs Simplicity 

WordPress and Drupal have many things in common. Both are open source and freely available, are supported by their developer communities who contribute code to the projects including regular security updates, and offer extensive add-on functionality to the CMS core through plugins and modules.

Site builders or content managers who have used both systems often have a bias for WordPress over Drupal, considering WordPress the more user-friendly of the two. Before one can accurately make such an assessment, I believe the comparison must be apples to apples between comparably sized sites with similar functionality or complexity. If one compares how user-friendly WordPress is for creating and managing a personal blog or small business website that requires no customizations and has static content versus the complexities of using Drupal to build a site for the enterprise with dynamic relationships between various data points, that is not a reasonable comparison. It is true that Drupal has a higher learning curve than WordPress largely due to the amount of available customization that is built into its core. WordPress is simple to use, especially for blogs or small sites, but not necessarily scalable or suited for larger more complex sites. If pushed to the enterprise end of the spectrum above, would WordPress still maintain its user-friendliness and be able to scale? Conversely, Drupal is best suited for enterprise level sites with custom requirements and would add unnecessary development overhead if chosen for a small site or blog.

If WordPress and Drupal were Lego types...

I’ve often thought of Wordpress and Drupal in terms of Lego whereas:

Lego Duplo set, simple with large building blocks like Wordpress

Source: Lego.com

WordPress is like Lego Duplo where you can build things easily with preformed shapes as long as those preformed shapes match your specific needs. These preformed shapes equate to plugins to add functionality and pre-designed theme templates that determine the styles and layout of your site. Duplo blocks are appropriate for ages 2-5 or, in other words, personal projects or small to medium businesses with simpler requirements. 

 

Lego Technic race car is complex like Drupal

Source: Lego.com

Drupal is like Lego Technic where you can build whatever you can imagine with little to nothing preformed. Like Technic pieces, Drupal has highly configurable plugins that provide granular control over the functionality of your site and do not impose pre-selected designs to your theme. They are appropriate for ages 7-14 or, in other words, medium to large businesses or organizations with complex requirements. 

With that analogy in mind, let's explore some of the advantages of each platform.

Advantages of WordPress

Confession: I love WordPress. It’s true! As a non-developer with several personal projects outside of work, whether it was for my consultant friend who needed a five-page site with a contact form, a guitarist wanting to promote his music, or managing several blogs, WordPress meets those needs perfectly. Below are the features that stand out in my experience from which people draw the conclusion that WordPress is so user-friendly. 

Dashboard

Upon logging into WordPress you are presented a user-friendly and intuitive admin interface from which you can figure out almost instinctively how to manage your website. You can quickly navigate to various types of content or site functionality from the left rail admin toolbar. The admin toolbar has appropriately named menu items. Hovering over each one triggers a slide out sub navigation making it easy to find the action or setting for which you are looking.

Screenshot of Wordpress user-friendly dashboard

Media Library

Adding images to your content or as a featured image above a post or page is quite simple. With a click of a button, you can add images, audio or video files, documents, and PDFs. Images are automatically given responsive image styles so that they adapt appropriately to the width of one’s browser window or mobile device.

Though not specifically part of the media library, inserting YouTube or Vimeo videos into a post is as simple as pasting the URL. WordPress will render the video as embedded on the page (also works with Twitter and Instagram posts).

Adding Content

As noted above, the Dashboard provides quick access in a few different ways to add new content. The Add New Post (or another type of content) edit page has a visual WYSIWYG editor for formatting your content with links to add media, categories, tags, and visibility of your new post. You can easily view revisions after content has been published and revised with functionality that is provided out of the box.

Screenshot of Wordpress admin interface for adding a new blog

Plugins and Themes

I’m grouping these two together because here is where we begin to add to WordPress core and its out of the box functionality. I’ve used 3rd-party plugins to add custom forms, simple e-commerce capabilities, invoicing and client management features, automated backups, and SEO enhancements to WordPress sites. The WordPress Plugin Directory boasts 56,182 available plugins to add functionality that is not included or as customizable within WordPress core. Many plugins are completely free or offer freemium versions with more advanced premium features available for a one-time charge or subscription fee.

Wordpress.org ecommerce plugins

Likewise, the WordPress Theme Directory offers many free or commercial templates searchable by layout options, features, or subject (topic matter of your site). Themes typically have some customization built-in to control layout options, widgets, background images, and the like.

Screenshot of Wordpress themes and layout options

Updates

WordPress Core, installed plugins and themes can be updated with the click of a button through the Dashboard. 

screenshot of Wordpress plugin updates

*Plugins are a double-edged sword in that they add flexibility from a non-developer standpoint while simultaneously introducing more risk from a security standpoint. The more 3rd-party plugins you use, the more dependence you will have on those 3rd-parties keeping their code secure by providing timely updates. Security issues with WordPress are introduced most often through vulnerabilities exploited in plugins.

Lower development costs 

This isn’t a feature of WordPress, but it’s worth mentioning that if the “out of the box” solutions meet your needs and you are able to build a site without the assistance of a developer, it will cost you less. If you fall on the mom-and-pop end of the spectrum, have a lower development budget, and are not picky about every detail of design or functionality, WordPress is likely a great option for you.

Advantages of Drupal

Custom content types and views 

Whereas WordPress comes with two content types (posts and pages), Drupal also comes with two content types out of the box (article and basic page). However, it not only allows you to edit the fields for those content types but also create new content types and views without custom code that meet your specific requirements. If your site needs a blog, you can create a content type for blog posts and a view that displays them the way you want. If you need a staff directory, you can create a content type for staff that has fields for name, title, profile picture, bio, etc., and then create a view to display the staff in a list, a grid, or to whatever your specs require.

This is one way in which Drupal and WordPress differ. Drupal is an application framework that allows you to build what you need the way you need it. WordPress core starts as a blog that makes you add to core in order to manipulate its built-in behavior. For example, in order to disable blogging in WordPress, you have to install a 3rd-party plugin such as Disable Blogging in WordPress.

If you compare WordPress core and Drupal core, Drupal is far more robust than WordPress.

Access control and user permissions 

Out of the box Drupal core allows you to create and define your own user roles and associated permissions for each. If your site requirements call for multiple levels of user permissions with varying degrees of access, Drupal lets you create new roles and assign them with custom permissions. And, unlike WordPress, Drupal allows granting more than one role to your users. This gives you fine-grained control over what they are allowed to do. Building on the previous example of a staff directory, you could create a role for Staff and only give that role permissions to edit one’s bio page. All of these customizations for roles and permissions can be done in the admin without adding any custom code.

Screenshot of managing roles in Drupal CMS

screenshot of permissions in Drupal

adding a new user in Drupal CMS

Taxonomy 

Whereas the tagging system in WordPress is flat, in Drupal you can have multiple types of categorization and determine how much information you want to track on each one. Drupal allows you to create more complex and custom data relationships across various types of content.

screenshot of taxonomy terms in Drupal CMS

Internationalization 

Want the Drupal admin to display in the native language of your officemate overseas? No problem! Native language handling is now built into Drupal 8’s core APIs which improve the ease of globalization management. Building a multilingual site no longer requires installing multiple contributed modules. 

Drupal 8 multilingual configuration

Security 

Drupal is known for having a volunteer security team and a standardized set of policies and procedures for dealing with security issues. Security advisories are routinely posted on https://www.drupal.org/security for Drupal core as well as contributed projects. For enterprise clients with specific security needs, the Drupal distribution Guardr is available with a combination of modules and settings to enhance the Drupal application’s security.   

Drupal.org security advisory

Customization

As a web application framework, Drupal can be adapted to meet very specific requirements. For example, the Drupal entity system allows tracking specific data points and values that are needed when building applications. At times, Content Types aren’t the best choice for these data elements, and more custom entities allow for improved performance and fit the requirements best.

If this has you scratching your head, you’re not the only one. I’m purposely skirting around the complexity of the section because it is beyond the scope of what I’m trying to speak to here. The important difference here is that Drupal allows tracking points of data without cluttering up the editorial experience. Sometimes the data needs to be seen but not heard. Drupal lets you do that. And site editors may never even realize it’s happening.

Conclusion

As a site builder who has built dozens of sites in HTML, Joomla, and WordPress and worked for five years as a project manager at Mediacurrent (almost exclusively with Drupal), I realize that the Lego analogy may be helpful but at the same time not completely accurate. After all, WordPress boasts such enterprise level sites such as Techcrunch, Sony Music, and Time, Inc. But my experience reinforces the perception that WordPress is amazing at simple sites or blogs while Drupal is the go-to for more complex sites. 

I’ve found that clients will like a template design exactly the way it comes except for “insert numerous design changes” or the plugin functionality as-is “if you change this one behavior that isn’t built into the plugin.” And at that point, the gains of using out of the box functionality and design offered by WordPress (either via core WordPress or plugins and themes) are lost to customizations and a custom Drupal implementation is preferred. If you fall on the enterprise end of the spectrum and have deeply refined technical requirements, Drupal is likely a great option for you.

It comes down to the level of complexity for which you need to plan. If you are building a large site that is essentially brochureware (static pages), WordPress will work for you. If your site requirements call for a dynamic application with a heavy reliance on custom search results, interactivity, or 3rd-party integrations, or if you have specific design needs that require multiple custom layouts, your best bet is to use Drupal 8.

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Meet team member, Rob McBryde

Rob is a 13 year veteran of website development, former small business owner, and total Internet addict. He leverages his broad business acumen, paired with a background in online marketing...

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